Making A Bath Panel

Our bathroom cladding is an ideal material for making a bath panel. Constructing the panel out of cladding results in a more uniform appearance for the room and gives the bath a built-in feel.

The method used to make a bath panel will depend upon the type of bath that is being installed and the location of the bath (against a flat wall, in a corner, in an alcove).

Panels For Acrylic Baths

Most acrylic baths have a slot under the rim into which a standard acrylic bath panel fits. Providing this slot is wide enough to accept the cladding chosen then installation can be as simple as fixing a batten to the floor under the bath and then fixing the panel to this. Chrome mirror screws are used for fixing as they look very attractive and allow the panel to be removed should access to the underside of the bath be required.

Panels For Steel Or Cast Iron Baths

Steel and cast iron baths do not have this slot so a framework would have to be construction to which the panels are attached. Alternatively the bathroom cladding can be attached to a sheet of thin plywood to make a one-piece panel that can then be installed in place with mirror screws to enable its removal should it be necessary.

Corner bath panels are more of a problem, as are shower baths (P shaped baths). Here, a curved framework has to be constructed which, although do-able, is quite tricky as the curve has the match that of the bath minus the thickness of the panels. To get the panels to follow the curve they have to be split on the back, which can be problematic in itself – see the bending panels section in our installation guide. If attempting to fit the panels to a corner bath, we would recommend using very narrow panels such as Ligno 10 which are only 100mm wide.

Free-standing cast iron baths do not require any panelling so making a bath panel is not necessary.

Here are some more examples of bath panels – click on any of the photos below to find out more:

bath-panel
bath panel 2
bath panel 3
bath panel 4